France Leg 15 Virtual Journey - Bordeux

Virtual Journey - Bordeux, France with Open Rails and MSTS

Leg 15 - Bordeux, France with Open Rails and MSTS

The virtual journey is now in France, Europe. After flying from Calais-Dunkerque to Bordeux with X-Plane 10 we are now using Open Rails and MSTS (Microsoft Train Simulator) with the FREE route Tramway de Bordeaux. A night tram and day tram is taken around the city of Bordeux.

Map of the Route

bordeux

Bordeux, France

Bordeaux, hub of the famed wine-growing region, is a port city on the Garonne River in southwestern France. It’s known for its Gothic Cathédrale Saint-André, 18th- to 19th-century mansions and notable art museums such as the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux. Public gardens line the curving river quays. The grand Place de la Bourse, centered on the Three Graces fountain, overlooks the Miroir d’Eau reflecting pool.

Bordeaux, hub of the famed wine-growing region, is a port city on the Garonne River in southwestern France. It’s known for its Gothic Cathédrale Saint-André, 18th- to 19th-century mansions and notable art museums such as the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux. Public gardens line the curving river quays. The grand Place de la Bourse, centered on the Three Graces fountain, overlooks the Miroir d’Eau reflecting pool.

bordeux1 bordeux.4PNG 

The municipality (commune) of Bordeaux proper has a population of 243,626 (2012). Together with its suburbs and satellite towns Bordeaux is the centre of the Bordeaux Métropole, which with 749,595 inhabitants (as of 2013) and 1,178,335 in the Metropolitan Area, the sixth largest in France. It is the capital of the Aquitaine-Limousin-Poitou-Charentes region, as well as the prefecture of the Gironde department. Its inhabitants are called "Bordelais" (for men) or "Bordelaises" (women). The term "Bordelais" may also refer to the city and its surrounding region.

The city's titles are "La perle d'Aquitaine" (The Pearl of Aquitaine), and "La Belle Endormie" (Sleeping Beauty) in reference to the old centre which had black walls due to pollution. Nowadays, this is not the case. In fact, a part of the city, Le Port de La Lune, was almost completely renovated. Bordeaux is the city which has the highest number of preserved historical buildings in France, except for Paris.

Bordeaux is the world's major wine industry capital. It is home to the world's main wine fair, Vinexpo, while the wine economy in the metro area takes in 14.5 billion euros each year. Bordeaux wine has been produced in the region since the 8th century. The historic part of the city is on the UNESCO World Heritage List as "an outstanding urban and architectural ensemble" of the 18th century.

Bordeux Tram

The Bordeaux tramway network (French: Tramway de Bordeaux) consists of three lines serving the city of Bordeaux in Aquitaine in southwestern France.

The first line of Bordeaux's modern tramway opened on 21 December 2003; further extensions have increased the route length to 43.9 kilometres (27.3 mi).[1] The system is notable for using a ground-level power supply of the Alimentation par Sol (APS) system in the city centre. It is operated by Keolis Bordeaux since 1 May 2009.

Tramway at place de la Comédie in the 1900s
The first tramway line of Bordeaux, with cars towed by horses, dates back to 1880. In 1946, the public transportation system in Bordeaux had 38 tram lines with a total length of 200 kilometres (120 mi), carrying 160,000 passengers per day. A rudimentary system of ground-level power supply was used on some stretches with mixed success. As in other French cities at the time the mayor, Jacques Chaban-Delmas (first elected in 1947), embraced anti-tram arguments and decided to terminate the operation of the tramway. He found the tramway to be old-fashioned compared to the bus and its attachment to set tracks on the ground hindered the increasing flow of cars. The lines were closed one after the other. In 1958 the last line of tramway was terminated.

A particular feature of the new Bordeaux tram network is its ground-level power supply system which is used in the city centre to avoid overhead wires spoiling the view of buildings. This was the source of many difficulties and breakdowns when first introduced. Improvements since then, however, have increased reliability and the network is now one of Bordeaux's principal plus points, valued not just for enabling the people of the city to get about easily but also for its contribution to the aesthetics of the city and its quality of life. The new trams are an essential part of Bordeaux's current tourist redynamization strategy. The three lines were extended in 2007 and 2008 to reach several housing estates as well as the suburb of Mérignac. The whole system is under video surveillance, with a camera installed inside each vehicle.

Bordeaux B

Hours of operation and headways
Trams operate on all lines from around 4.30am until midnight, seven days a week with later service on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays until around 1.30am. All stops have panels showing the waiting time until the next tram. On Sunday and holiday mornings, trams run every 30/40 minutes until around 1000am then every 20 minutes. Weekday and Saturday services operate every 10 – 12 minutes with additional service during 'rush hour' and for special events. However, there is no service at all on May 1, Labour Day holiday.

The network

Bordeaux Tramway Line A, Bordeaux Tramway Line B, and Bordeaux Tramway Line C

As of July 2009, the Bordeaux tram network has a total route length of 43.9 kilometres (27.3 mi), with 90 stops.

The current routes of the three lines are:

Line
A 20.6 km (12.8 mi) 41 Mérignac Centre - La Gardette Bassens Carbon Blanc and Floriac Dravemont
B 15.2 km (9.4 mi) 32 Pessac Centre (via the University campus) - Berges de la Garonne
C 8.1 km (5.0 mi) 17 Terres Neuves (via Gare de Bordeaux-Saint-Jean) - Berges du Lac

Plan du réseau des tramways de Bordeaux 1

The first line (Line A) was opened on 21 December 2003 in the presence of President Jacques Chirac, and the mayor of Bordeaux, Alain Juppé. It ran between Mériadeck and Lormont/Cenon. It was extended on 26 September 2005 to new termini at the Pellegrin Hospital and Saint-Augustin. Further extensions opened in 2007; from Cenon to Floriac on 27 February 2007; and from Saint-Augustin to Mérignac Centre on 21 June 2007. A new extension from Lormont Lauriers to Carbon Blanc opened in May 2008.

Line C was the next to open between Quinconces and Gare St Jean, on 24 April 2004, following delays. The first part of the southern extension from Gare St. Jean to Terres Neuves was opened in February 2008, as was the northern section to Les Aubiers. From there via Berges du Lac (February 2014) to the final terminus at Parc Des Expositions in the Bordeaux Lac commercial and exhibition district it went into service in January 2015. This was followed in mid-March 2015 by the southwards extension to Lycée V. Havel (Villenave-d'Ornon).

Line B was partially opened on 15 May 2004 and throughout on 3 July 2004. 29 May 2007 saw the opening of the first phase of its 2007 extension of when it began to serve Pessac Centre at its western end. On 23 July 2007 a further extension of the line from its previous terminus at Quinconces, along the left bank of the Garonne, to a station at Bassins à Flot opened. The final extension to northern terminus of the line at Cité Claveau, near to the Pont d'Aquitaine on the Bordeaux ring road, opened in October 2008.The main depot for trams is at Thiers Benauge (off Line A) and a secondary depot has opened on Line B at Rue Achard on the new extension towards Claveau.

Simulator used:

Open Rails and Microsoft Train Simulator

Addon Routes

Tramway de Boerdeux

trambordeux

Video of The Journey

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tz8FkDgQlF8

Screenshots of the journey in Bordeux, France