UK Leg 9 Virtual Journey - London, Kings Cross to Notting Hill

Virtual Journey - London, Kings Cross to Notting Hill

Leg 9 - London, Kings Cross to Notting Hill using World of Subways 3

World of Subways 3, The london underground simulator is used for this leg of the journey. Now in the capital city of the United Kingdom, the virtual journey will travel around this city using one of it's most famous and iconic forms of travel. The london Underground.

 

Map of the Route - The Circle Line

circlelinekingscrosstonottinghill

 

The Circle Line

The Circle line is a London Underground service in a spiralling shape, running from Hammersmith to Edgware Road and then looping once around central London back to Edgware Road. The railway is below ground in the central section and on the loop east of Paddingdon, and, unlike London's deep-level tube railways, the railway tunnels are just below the surface and of similar size to those on British main lines. Coloured yellow on the tube map, the 17-mile (27 km) line serves 36 stations, including most of London's main line railway termini. Most of the route and all of the stations are shared with the District, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines. On the Circle line and the Hammersmith & City line combined, over 114 million passenger journeys are made each year. 21 of the 36 stations are below ground.

 

The first section opened in 1863 when the Metropolitan Railway opened the world's first underground line between Paddington and Farringdon with wooden carriages and steam locomotives. The same year a select committee report recommended an 'inner circle' of railway lines connecting the London railway termini, and the Metropolitan District Railway (commonly known as the District Railway) was formed to build the southern portion of the line. Due to conflict between the two companies it was October 1884 before the inner circle was completed. The line was electrified in 1905, and in July 1933 the two companies were amalgamated into the London Passenger Transport Board. In 1949 the Circle line appeared as a separate line for the first time on the Tube map. In December 2009 the closed loop around the centre of London on the north side of the River Thames was broken at Edgware Road and extended west to become a spiral serving Hammersmith.

The signalling system is being upgraded and the C Stock trains have recently been replaced by new 7-car S Stock trains, in a programme completed in 2015.

 

Kings Cross Station, London

King's Cross St. Pancras is a London Underground station located within the London Borough of Camden. It serves King's Cross and St Pancras main line stations and falls within fare zone 1. Being an interchange station between six lines, (the Circle, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan, Northern, Piccadilly and Victoria lines) it is the second busiest station on the network, second only to Waterloo.

King's Cross St Pancras is the biggest interchange station on the London Underground, serving six lines on four pairs of tracks as well as two National Rail stations.

Kings Cross St Pancras stn Piccadilly northbound look south

The first underground station at King's Cross opened as part of the original section of the Metropolitan Railway in 1863 and was rearranged in 1868 and 1926. New platforms for the sub-surface lines of the Underground were opened about 400 m (440 yd) to the west in 1941 to make interchanging between the sub-surface lines and the tube lines easier; the 1868 platforms later became the former King's Cross Thameslink station, which closed on 9 December 2007 when the Thameslink service moved to St Pancras International. One of the platforms may be seen from Underground trains between the present station and Farringdon.

The Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR, now part of the Piccadilly line) platforms opened with the rest of the line in December 1906, while the City & South London Railway (C&SLR, now part of the Northern line) arrived in May 1907. The Victoria line platforms came into use on 1 December 1968 with the opening of the second phase of the line. The Victoria line escalators cut through the location of the original Piccadilly line lifts.

 

Notting Hill Station

Notting Hill Gate is a London Underground station in the street known as Notting Hill Gate. On the Central line, it is between Holland Park to the west and Queensway to the east. On the District line and Circle line it is between High Street Kensington and Bayswater stations. It is on the boundary of Travelcard Zone 1 and Zone 2.

The sub-surface Circle and District line platforms were opened on 1 October 1868 by the Metropolitan Railway (MR) as part of its extension from Paddington to Gloucester Road. The Central line platforms were opened on 30 July 1900 by the Central London Railway (CLR). Entrances to the two sets of platforms were originally via separate station buildings on opposite sides of the road and access to the CLR platforms was originally via lifts.

NottingHillGate

The station name Notting Hill Gate had potential for confusion with the MR station to the north in Ladbroke Grove which was known as "Notting Hill" when opened in 1864, and renamed "Notting Hill & Ladbroke Grove" in 1880. This latter station eventually, in 1919, dropped its reference to Notting Hill, becoming "Ladbroke Grove (North Kensington)" in 1919 and, simply, "Ladbroke Grove" in 1938 (see Ladbroke Grove tube station).

Simulator Used

 

World of Subways 3

Video of The Journey

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU_8ySuXEog

 

Screenshots of the journey King Cross to Notting Hill